NHS to Stockpile Likes, Shares, Hopes & Prayers

The NHS is taking unprecedented action to guard against the potential negative impact of a no deal Brexit by stockpiling social media likes, shares, hopes and prayers.

Verity Winthrop-Smithe, Social Media Chief Strategist and Engagement Champion at NHS England, told Nurse Station that “Likes and Shares have never been so important to the delivery of healthcare in this country. Patient recovery is now considered to be directly proportional to the number of social media engagements relating to their episode of care.”



In recent years patients in the NHS have seen a dramatic rise in helpful external interventions such as “OMG you OK hun?” and “You OK? PM me?”. These interventions are often from people who haven’t actually seen or spoken to the person directly in years. According to social media intervention practitioners, such as Sharon Lafferty, 27 from Carlisle, this demonstrates the efficiency of social media intervention, given that it s always practised remotely.

However, there are fears that a no deal Brexit could result in a reduction in social media interventions due to the increased feeling of “Britshness” which may result in patients returning to a culture of stoicism. We spoke to Carling Beckham, a self confessed “Brexiteer”. He spoke of the “good old days” when “…someone would have a major operation and you wouldn’t even know about it until you were invited to the funeral.” Despite Craling’s optimism there are those who are concerned about the possibility of a return to this behaviour.

Financial analysts have estimated that Facebook likes alone save the NHS £3.5m per week. Although these figures are disputed by the official leave campaign who stated “It’s totally unacceptable to band around figures such as these. This isn’t some cheap advertising campaign on public transport, it’s peoples lives we are talking about.”



In an attempt to reduce the potential impact NHS trusts are asking potential patients to request likes, shares, hopes and prayers from fiends and family for use in the event that they become ill and require hospital care. This approach has drawn criticism from the Association of Social Media Intervention Practitioners (#ASMIP), who are concerned that people do not fully understand the potential harm that can be done by using such powerful care delivery methods without proper training.

Have you been cured by a thumbs up, poo emoji or praying hands sign? We’d like to hear from you.